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of politics at jfk school of government at harvard. john lewis gaddis next to me is one of the leading historians of the cold war. he won the pulitzer prize for his biography of the diplomats george f. cats. john lewis gaddis's work as robert lovett prof. of history and influenced the work of cold war historians all over the world. played a major role on uncovering the role of leadership personalities, the influence of his work can be seen in the 24 part cnn television series cold war. a graduate of universal -- yale university, class of, can you help me, i was missing that detail. mr. evans, his book blacklisted by history the untold story of senator joe mccarthy and his fight against america's enemies gives an account of the age of mccarthyism during the cold war. evans has been the recipients of honorary doctorates from institutions like syracuse university and the john marshall law school and has won accuracy in media irvine award for excellence in journalism. join me in welcoming our panelists. [applause] [applause] >> lee, would you like to start? >> it is such a pleasure and hon
folks could have had a living, breathing civil lenl end there with them. oh, wait. they did. john lewis m.l.a.k.'s still alive friend and colleague was right there. hmmm. how did that go? >> congressman and civil rights icon john lewis showed up but they refused to let him speak. >> in which no singular human being >> in which no singular human being is inherently more valuable than any other human being. >> jon: i don't know what to say i'm shocked, jon. they missed a great chance to ask him what martin luther king would think of their movement. we can make king endorse whatever we want. have you seen the commercial are hologram m.l.k. has a dream about telecommunications before >> before you can inspire... we hold these truths to be self-evident >> ... you must first connect and the company that connects more of the world is a leader in communication network >> i may not get to the mountain top of the wi-fi but i will be free at last. -x,yy5éxéxhtht ( cheers and applause ) >> jon: welcome back. my guest tonight is a united states supreme court justice. please welcome to the practi
including douglas brinkley, and congressman john lewis. please let us know about book fairs and festivals in your air and we will add them to our list. post on her wall at facebook.com/booktv or e-mail us at booktv@c-span.org. >> for the next three hours booktv brings your a few panels and other presentations from the 2013 key west literary seminar in florida. first we hear from paul hendrickson, author of hemingway's -- "hemingway's boat". >> good morning, good morning, thank you. i moved up my flight, then go to the airport after, literally right after i spend ten minutes here reading and i am going to read something quite short on the theory that less is more which i try to tell my writing students. speaking of them, one of the reasons, hurtling back to philadelphia, i have to hold office hours with the lovely the 0 ivy brats. i bet get home and sleep well all the we haven't slept wilson's the jimmy carter administration. thank you, you holding up is the key. i bet i won't even have time to formally say thank you and goodbye. i will the say to miles how eloquent his little segway intro
of political journalism at georgetown and a fellow at the jfk school of government at harvard. john lewis gaddis one of the leading historian of the cold war. professor john lewis gaddis won the pulitzer prize for his biography and his work cold war. finally m. stanton evans the graduate of yale 1955. he has been one of the most leading members of the conservative movement's. his book blacklisted by history gives the account of the age of mccarthyism during the cold war. evans is three separate -- recipient from syracuse and john marshall law school and has won the accuracy irvine award for excellence in journalism. please join me to welcome our panelist. [applause] lee edwards would you like to start? >> it is such a pleasure and honor to be here. i was flattered to be asked for the first one last year. and i see some good friends out here and people including senator buckley he deserves a round of applause. [applause] lets us begin with a paradox. whitaker chambers was a soviet spy who became the most important american defector from communism. the attractions of communism began in augu
have needed selma? if john lewis had had a gun, would he have been beat upside the head on the bridge? >> i have to tell you -- >> karen, listen, this is disgusting. first of all, it's not original -- >> rush is now -- it sounds like he's trying to be a member of the black panthers. this is ridiculous. >> well, there's that irony as well. but it's not original. he's taking it from the comments from the other right wing nut job who was talking about if slaves had guns. first of all, there are plenty of shotgun owners during the civil rights era, but to reduce john lewis' service to this country and the civil rights movement and the black experience and the overall american experience in this country to him getting beat upside the head is disgusting and offensive. this is a man who served his country through civil rights and through service in the congress. to reduce his life to that to me is unacceptable. >> i agree. as you may know, i actually went with john lewis on his annual pilgrimage. we crossed the bridge in selma, heard the stories from him. the other thing that's so infuriatin
-town in south africa. c-span: and john lewis. >> guest: john lewis, young man grew up stuttering, preaching to chickens in rural alabama, went to college in ashbel, became a screen writer on one of the shock troops and the most devoted of king's followers on the students and is now a congressman from -- she's my mom and dad's, from the fifth district of atlanta. c-span: james bevel. >> guest: james bevel, john the baptist of the -- front of the john lewis' out of the national movement with his wife die and who was kind of face to all bones of the freedom rides coo kids in their early 20s to lead the freedom rides, then went on to recommend the use of children when the birmingham movement was suffocated. and later in testament the children who were bombed in birmingham in 1963, they really devised as their response to the bombing what became the selma voting rights movement to win the right to vote for minorities across the south. c-span. wachtel. >> guest: harry wachtel, dr. king's lawyer, one of the early corporate and merger lawyers in new york city whose conscience stirred him because hi
had a bullish update from john lewis yesterday. now neck, as well. what's the read through here? >> good morning, ross. i think the read through is that the bigger players on the high street continue to perform well, continue to attract the traffic both through foot fall and on line, as well. very prominent online offerings and this is what differentiates a lot of the larger companies from the retailers on the high street that obviously struggled throughout last year. >> and what are the indications on the early sales news? >> well, i think the indications are that the stocks have been surprisingly good despite the obvious issues with the uk economy. certainly what we see from neck is that they're seeing a continuation of the first three quarters of the year into the christmas period. perhaps not as bumpy as we saw for john lewis. but thanks to the other measures we've taken, they're pushing measures up. >> and a very strong move yesterday, which is a broad based move. the growth is underperforming. really not going with the rest of the market. what is the concern for them? >> t
. thank you. >> thank you. >> good evening commissioners, my name is john lewis. and i live on harvard street a few doors away from the site where applicants seek to relocate their business. i want to emphasize to the commission how much neighbors wish the applicant's business remain where it is now or relocate to a neighborhood more intended for commercial purposes. by my count of neighbors who contacted the planning commission, 49 neighbors did not support it. only 5 neighbors supported. these 47 people are diverse, some are young with children, some middle-aged, some are elderly. some have lived in the neighborhood for decades and others have moved to the neighborhood more recently, because they sought a quiet neighborhood. i was particularly struck by the letter of noel loxson on behalf of his elderly montgomery mother, who lives right next door to the subject property. he writes on her behalf, i she has lived there for more than 30 years and at her age she likes the quietness of the neighborhood. by having a child-care next door. and gordon lieu writes, "it's always been a nice
- 11-30headdcoach john harbauuh......ann retiringgall- pro linebackee ray lewis will be there...as well as members of the uper bowl teammfrom you can counn on 33from 2000 super bowl team fro 2000 3 you can bb there as baltimore gives the ravens a big rally at the inner harbbr ampitheater...monddy morninn pt 11-30 11-30head coach john pro linebacker ray lewis will be there....s welllas members of the super bowl teem from 2000 3 from 2000 super bowl team ...as well as therelewis will be ro linebacker raa ...and retiring all-head coach john 110 11-30monday morning at &pampitheater...inner harbor a rally at the the city is holding sendoof. the ravens a big as baltimore gives yoo can as baltimore gives the ravens holding a rally at the inner harbor ampitheater...monday morning aa 11-30 11-30head coach john harbaugh......and reeiriig all- pro linebacker ray lewis will be there...as well as mmmbers 2000 you can count on fox45 for live coverage of suuee bowl 47. pports director bruce ccnningham will be in new orleans starting sunday wiih the latest on the baltimore ravens aa they make one las
. >>> y a moment, georgia's legendary congressman john lewis with his thoughts on what president obama can accomplish in his second term. >>> and the inaugural big three on the current mood of the country and if the president can bridge the wide political gap in washington. stay with us. you're watching "weekends with alex witt." ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just have to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. ahh, cloudy glasses. you didn't have to come over! easy. hi. cascade kitchen counselor. look! over time, cascade complete pacs fight film buildup two times better than finish quantum to help leave glasses sparkling. c
, congressman john lewis, he will be here, we will speak to him in just a moment. >> we're going to talk about what this inauguration means for him and also the challenges still ahead in the president's second term. [ tylenol bottle ] nyquil what are you doing? [ nyquil bottle ] just reading your label. wait...you relieve nasal congestion? sure don't you? [ nyquil bottle ] dude! [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] you don't have to be a golf pro to walk like one. ♪ when you walk 10,000 steps a day, it's the same as walking a professional golf course. humana. health and well-being partner of the pga tour. humana. officemax can help you drive suand down.s down... use your maxperks card and get a 10-ream case of officemax multiuse paper for just 4.99 after maxperks rewards. find thousands of big deals now... at officemax. ♪ ♪ hi dad. many years from now, when the subaru is theirs... hey. you missed a spot. ...i'll look back on this day and laugh. love. it's what makes a subaru, a sub
this past pastor including senator rand paul, government bullies and represented john lewis wrote another book, across that bridge about his experience. senator marco rubio a biography, an american son and represented tim ryan a mindful nation how a single practice can help reduce stress, improve performance and recapture the american spirit. a little off the beaten path for members of congress. senator tom coburn, the debt bomb and robert draper has written a book about congress. do not ask what good we do inside the u.s. house of representatives. do either of you look for these books when they come out by members of congress or politicians? >> guest: i certainly know them but i feel as if at least from my standpoint that these books are way too entrenched the members of congress not only in their positions but also potentially to position them for future runs, be it within their current offices or maybe something different. so, it seems as if it's more of a calling card then it is furthering their career as authors. certainly, being authors of books is yet another feather in the cap of
of his host, and young john lewis from the -- from smic, the chairman of the student nonviolent coordinating committee, told me, that's the only time i've ever seen martin cry. the tears were pouring down his face. lewis would tell you, andrew young, king's top lieutenant would tell you, that he was a totally rational person as he went about the business of leading his part of this movement. he was not seeking martyrdom. he was deathly afraid everytime he went out into an exposed situation. he refused sometimes, saying, when the young snic guys were pushing him to do something particularly dangerous, i think i ought to have the right to choose my own golgatha, one name for the hill where jesus was crucified. there was one more minor crisis before that 1965 voting rights act got passed. the senate liberals led by ted and robert kennedy, were trying to attach to the bill a constitutional amendmentle outlawing the poll tax. this was something that needed to be done, obviously. the attorney general katzenback feared the courts were going to say it's unconstitutional. you have to do
are honored to have witnessed a colleague, congressman john lewis was a speaker at that historic march. >> [applause] >>shows the courage and sacrifice that has made our nation great. please stand and take about so we all can recognize a. you >> [applause] >> behind us the painting we have chosen for this luncheon is niagara falls. painted in 1856. never fails to inspire a tremendous offer the natural beauty of our great country. then and now the mighty fall symbolizes the grandeur, power and possibility of america. i want to thank my former senate partner are a great secretary of state hillary clinton for allowing us to borrow this beautiful paintings from the state department collection. frankly we are not here for the paintings. we're here for the food. the theme of today's ceremony is based in america's future, today is a menu. from the new england lobster to the heirloom decibels, the south dakota bison, the wonderful new york lines. it was actually chosen by the tasting committee that consisted of that the banner landry read, then a cantor, paul plus a, honey alexander. they
. john lewis -- his wife died in atlanta on monday. she was 73. they were married for 44 years. in his memoirs, he credited his wife was launching his political career. >> hillary clinton will spend another day in a new york hospital where she is being treated for a blood clot. doctors are using blood thinners to break it up behind her right ear. she went to the hospital on sunday after it was found during a follow-up examination for a concussion she suffered last month. doctors say she will make a full recovery but it is not clear yet when she will leave the hospital. >> is wearing in a ceremony will be held at the washington tibetan center for the council members beginning four year terms. an organizational meeting will be held later in the day at the wilson building. >> in the day ahead, two men accused of brutally beating a man near eastern market are expected to return to court today. they are scheduled to appear for a status hearing. they face aggravated assault and other charges in connection with the august beating. it third person also faces charges related to the attack that
their constitutional right to vote. my good friend and lifelong colleague, john lewis, has called the right to vote precious, almost sacred. >> 30 seconds. >> thank you the powerful nonviolent tool to create a more perfect union. john could not be here to speak on this motion today. but i'm proud to stand with mr. miller. it is a small but important step to fulfilling our obligation to protect the right to vote. i urge the patz -- passage of this commitment. >> gentleman yields back, gentleman from texas. >> i appreciate the gentleman coming down and with his words today. by the way, the gentleman mentioned motion to commit. we have yet to see that. if there is one, i would appreciate the gentlewoman from new york or the clerk could provide that to me. the chance for us today -- >> if i can just address that if i may. mr.i would yield to the gentleman. >> madam speaker, the motion be committed at the proper time. we will give the motion. we're not yet -- >> reclaiming my time when that is available, we would appreciate that opportunity. that's been spoken about on the floor. today, what we're talki
members of congress to be able to go and vote. you may recall, of that. people like john lewis were called racial epithets, this wasn't isolated. this was in the nation's capital and around the country. whether it is guns or this issue of mental health or anything that is a hot button issue, where we can't talk to one another. that is the more disruptive, disturbing thing. i felt threatened, when he was threatening you. the fact that we are not thinking about one another in those ways. he was assaulting your human dignity. >> i mean, personally, i never felt threatened by him. it was one of those, you will let him talk. he has millions listen to him and believe what he says. there is a leading commentator in american society, saying that the american government ordered this under president bush this is the stuff of madness. >> when you talk about guns, being able to be purchased by people who have underlying mental illness, i wrote a book about addiction, 60% of those who present who have one, have the other. ill folks who are able to get weapons of mass destruction. >> that is what the we
and vote. you may recall that. and people like john lewis were being called epithets, racial epithets. this wasn't isolated. this was happening in our nation's capital and around the country. whether it is guns or the issue of mental health or anything that is a hot button issue, where we can't talk to one another, and that i think is the more disruptive, disturbing thing. i mean, i felt threatened when he was threatening you. and the fact that we're not thinking about one another in those ways. he was assaulting your human dignity. >> i mean, personally, i never felt threatened by him. what i felt was it was one of those interviews where you just want to let him talk. because getting inside the mind of a man who has millions of people that listen to him every week and believe what he says, there is a sort of leading commentator in american society actually saying the american government, under president bush, ordered 9/11. i mean, this is the stuff of madness. >> it is scary. i think the underlying thing is when you are talking about the guns being able to be purchased by people who
.c. these are common sense, practical solutions. members have to be unafraid to stand in the way as john lewis would say. >> thank you. i greatly appreciate your time. are the me bring in our panel, tim murphy and senior political reporter for politico and michael smerconish, a radio talk show host. let me start with you. there is an article today that said why president obama's gun plan may be doomed and said there strong indications that comprehensive legislation won't even see a vote on the house flew. you heard me. wasn't to put him on the pot, but i watched like you since new town and people said things have changed. i have yet to see and maybe you know of a few republican who is said things have changed and maybe it is time to put a man on assault weapons or some of the language ta is different than what we are hearing accusing the president of tyranny a power grab and the other accusations. >> let's separate two things. first of all, if you watch that press conference, a good solid one third was a direct appeal to the american people. he repeated himself over and over again. you heard congres
authors including douglas, philip, and congressman john lewis. please let us know about book fairs and festivals in your area. we'll add them of our list. post them to our wall at facebook.com/booktv. or e-mail@booktv@c-span.org. >>> we're working with jefferson "snow-storm in august." what happened in washington, d.c., in 1835? >> francis scott key was the bring attorney and the city authorities lost all control of the city. it was the beginning of the conflict over slavery. the ideological conflict over slave i are and the white population started attacking the free black population that was active in the antislavery movement. it was wide spread disorder. he was responsible and it was a humiliation for him and the city. >> it started with a man named arthur bowen. who is that? >> a servant 19 years old in the home of anna marie, a well-known women in washington. he was alleged to have attacked her in her bedroom at night with the ax. it was sensational news of the alleged attack that set off the white population to attack the black population. in fact, there was no attack. >> how
the way back to a deal that john lewis and harry truman made in 1946. the united mine workers and i insisted on a new law that we called the colal act protecting 200,000 miners and their families today. we actually helped avert a nationwide coal strike in 1994. in that fight, and so many others, we have been proud to stand with the working men and women of america. steelworkers, teachers, nurses, and everyone deserves a fair wage and a safe place to work with a basic health care. [applause] our country cannot be as great as it should be unless our workers voices are heard and respected. not only by everybody in general, but certainly policymakers. i am just a single-minded about comprehensive health-care reform. i know is not particularly popular in west virginia, but it's ok. because of my fingerprints are all over it, i know is good and i know it will benefit west virginia more than any other state. it is so incredibly complex, not just the 17% of gdp has people like to say, but it is so complex and involved and interests of people, nuances that we just had to do something about i
? was a stokely carmichael or john lewis? >> guest: all of them have different roles. one of the ways in which i try to explain to students that parks made martin luther king possible. if she hadn't done what she did by refusing to give seat on that montgomery bus martin luther king would have simply been an articulate well meaning baptist minister. is because of rosa parks that we are talking about him today. he opened up -- she opened up the possibility for him to display those qualities that he had and to rise to the occasion. >> host: she also said as you well know that while she was sitting on the bus refusing to give seat she was thinking about emmett till, the young 14-year-old but what from chicago who went to mississippi in 1955 and because he looked at a white woman he was brutally murdered. do you think that changed or sparked anything in the civil rights movement? >> guest: a lot of things did. there was his death. there was the brown versus board of education decision. there was the killing of the civil rights workers. it was people like barbara jones, the young high school student
were the people who most moved things? was it king, malcolm x was it stokely carmichael, was it john lewis. one of the ways i try to explain the students rosa parks made martin luther king possible the didn't make rosa parks possible. if she hadn't done what she did by refusing to give up her seat on that montgomery bus, martin luther king would have been an articulate, well meaning baptist minister. he opened up, she open the possibility for him to display the qualities that they had and to rise to the location. >> host: she also said as you know while she was sitting on the bus refusing to give up her seat she was thinking about the material of a new young black boy from chicago who went to mississippi and because he looked at a woman he was brutally murdered. do you think that his death changed or sparked anything in the civil rights movement? >> guest: a lot of things did. it was his death, it was the brown v. board of education decision. as people like barbara johns, the high school student that led a walkout of the segregated school because of protesting in the interior educati
the movement and snic and others. who were the people that moved the most? king comment now, x, john lewis, stokely carmichael? >> all of the above. i tried to explain to students rosa parks made more to mr. king possible. not vice versa. if she did not do what she had done margin mr. king would be inarticulate well-meaning baptist minister. because of rosa parks we talk about him today. she opened up the possibility to open those qualities to rise to the equation. >> host: while she refused to give up her seat she was thinking of the 14 year-old black boy from chicago who went to mississippi because he whistled at a white woman was brutally murdered. to that change your spark anything with the civil rights movement? >> his death, brown vs. board of education decision killing of civil-rights workers, the young high-school student who led a walkout to protest against fifth inferior education. 1951. many people we don't even know there names or other teenagers who did the same thing. so the resistance largely among young people. >> definitely when you talk about south africa, we all remember
's no question that we can. and we will fight it, reverend. just this week, democrats led by john lewis dropped the bill if in the house. it's called the voter empowerment act. it is designed to stop some of these deceptive prak fiss. we are not going to sit by and allow them to steal elections just because they can't win fair and square. now, governor, you've seen this up close in pennsylvania. the ramifications of this is to really undo the whole democratic process that has been used since we started with the electoral college. >> there's no question, reverend sharpton. it would have disastrous and unfair consequences. for example, in pennsylvania, go back to the 2008 election. barack obama carried this state by 11 points, almost a historic landslide. but senator mccain would have gotten 10 to president obama's 11 at the time. >> i think we all should be aware that states have the right to proportion their votes in any way they want. in nebraska, they already do this. it would be hard to be back -- i will tell you this. we're going to fight it tooth and nail in pennsylvania. thai treed they t
. >> and also, we were so fortunate to hear from john lewis as well, who was the only surviving person who actually spoke at that 1963 march on washington. he said it's a civil rights issue. but you know, this was really a big deal, this speech. when he first came on the scene, people said, could this man be the liberal ronald reagan? could he be someone who could articulate liberalism in terms that were motivating, that were deeply rooted in american values, and moved the country in his direction? i think this speech was the first signal that he has that potential. this is not just ghazi, happy talk, hope and change, kumbaya. this was him staking a claim to a different kind of patriotism. and saying that in order for us to be who the founders want us to be, we have toticontinue to include the dr. kings and the latino community and everybody else. that was powerful. >> let's take a look at a moment a lot of people have been talking ability. one of president obama's open mike moments. i did get the sense, i mean, you're saying he's not going to see this again. you got the sense in his makin
the speech. something we'll be discussing later with john lewis. it's an added emotional contact. >> absolutely. the civil rights movement created the possibility for barack obama to become president and i think he's ever mindful of that. i think that's where that community organizing comes in him. he knows that communities create the power. you think about the gay rights movement, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, this is all part of who he is and i think it's part of american history. when i look at american history, those movements are critical in transforming our attitudes about ourselves and about one another. and that's where real change takes place. lincoln said, you control public sentiment, controls everything. even if they can't control my voice. >> sometimes when historians try to speak too much in the course of one inaugural weekend, this is what happens. we're going to allow doris rest her voice for a second. you saw when we were talking a motorcade and you'd be forgiven for thinking there's the president on the move from the white house. it was not. f
to the civil rights act, which made his rights possible. >> dana bash is standing by with john lewis. dana? >> that's right, we are honored to have john lewis here who is now member of congress, but most importantly, i think, given this day, you were a compatriot of martin luther king, jr. what did it feel like to stand here on martin luther king holiday with a black president being inaugerat ainaugurated fod time? >> it was very moving, unreal, almost unbelievable to see president obama taking the oath with martin luther king, jr. i saw him reading that on mabib many, many occasions. >> you heard in the president's speech mention in one breath thelma, stonewall, seneca falls. what did that mean to you? >> the president was saying in spite of our differences, in spite of all of our issues, the difficulties, that we're one people. we're one american. it doesn't matter whether we're black or white, hispanic, asian american, native american, it doesn't matter whether we're straight or gay, we're one people. we're one country. that we all live in the same house, the american house. >> you have
this is a very tight race. > here is your list for best actor: bradley cooper, daniel day-lewis, john hawkes, hugh jackman, denzel washington. i think daniel day-lewis is a sure thing. > > i think this is probably the second lock of the night after anne hathaway. > i am right behind you. let's talk about the oscar picks for the best movie. tough year to say the least: "zero dark thirty," "lincoln," "argo," "les mis," "silver linings," "life of pi,"django," "the master," "moonrise kingdom," and "beasts of the southern wild." > > we have that list you have laid out there, it's a list in sort of 1-through-10 order, because we don't know exactly how many films are going to be nominated. it could be seven, it could be 10, it could be eight, could be nine, we don't know. so that is my sort of list of the order i think has the best chance of getting in this year. > let's do a little talking about "zero dark thirty," because this is a big film that a lot of people will go to see this week, and there has been a ton of controversy about this, saying that it's taking a lot of liberties, some things did
, a democrat, voted for john lewis, his fellow democrat in georgia rather than nancy pelosi. jim cooper of ten tnessee voted for colin powell. you have a little bit on both sides. to me it speaks to -- there is clearly unrest, and, yet, it's not unified behind anyone. a couple votes for alan west. that's not going happen. a vote for labrador from idaho. one vote for eric cantor. it's not coalessed. john boehner for all the discomfort with him, that's clear within some conservative circles, the guy is going to be the speaker of the house. it's remarkable that conservatives couldn't unite even a little bit more as a show of force. >> i still believe the only person -- if he somehow expressed an interest, you would see the committee chairs, you would see a flocking. >> does this -- the question you have to be watching now is how this weakens or stretens his hand going into negotiations on the fiscal cliff -- not that, the debt ceiling. that remains to be seen. we'll have to leave it there. >> i guess. >> because -- >> i normally love to stay. i have to say that there's a bitter feeling. i love th
. this annual event features douglas brinkley and congressman john lewis. please let us know about book fairs and festivals in your area, and we'll add them to our list. post them to our wall at facebook.com/booktv. or e-mail us at booktv@c-span.org. >> you don't always find many newspaper editors in any era embracing investigative reporting. the point we've seen over the years it's not just economics, it's the discomfort that investigative reporting up causes in a newsroom -- often causes in a newsroom because it was troublesome. it's that more than the economics. if you're going to ruffle the feathers of somebody powerful, that gets those people running in to crane to the publisher, and the stories are legion over the years about those kinds of things happening. don and i were really fortunate all through the '70s and almost all our career to work for people who were really strong and upright in that area and just let the chips fall where they may. >> the pulitzer prize-investigating team of donald barlettennessee, and james steele are the co-authors of eight books. their latest, "the betra
at georgetown and is a fellow at the institute of politics at the jfk school of government at harvard. john lewis gas is one of the leading historians of the cold war. professor guess that the the pulitzer prize for his biography of the diplomat george kennan. professor gattis's work has influenced the work of cold war historians all over the world and played a major role in uncovering the role of leadership personalities in determining cold war policy. the influence of his work on the narrative of the cold war can be seen in the 24 part cnn television series cold war. finally evans, a graduate of yale university, class of -- can you help me? 1955. missing that detail. mr. evans is one of the leading members of the conservative movement in the united states. his book blacklisted by history:the untold story of senator joe mccarthy and his fight against america's enemies gives an account of the age of mccarthyism during the cold war. evans has been the recipients of honorary documents from syracuse university and the john marshall law school and accuracy in media award for excellence in journ
in birmingham and montgomery and other places. he passed the voting rights act after jose ya williams and john lewis were almost beaten to death at the pettis bridge. presidents who react to events with the spirit of leadership are going to be the most success so i don't think -- we can't isolate presidential leadership from what will be going on in the country. >> all true. and we honor president johnson because after the violence at selma he used the moment when americans were so outraged to go to congress and say let's have a voting rights act with the help of doris' husband who helped to write enormously powerful speech. but at the same time barack obama did not need to go intensely after gun control. after newtown he did. that's the difference. >> rose: i'm not sure i understand the difference. why isn't it the same? >> it's a difference from presidents who are inactive. >> rose: oh, i see. >> i would argue newtown was the closest thing to selma that we've had. and i think that that shows that this could be a strong second term. >> bob, what are the agenda items for the president beyond i
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